NEW Resources

The Transition to Adulthood for Youth and Young Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions: Pitfalls and Promises
Click here

post-divider-lg

Investing to Improve the Well-Being of Vulnerable Youth and Young Adults
Click here

Providing Youth and Young Adult Peer Support through Medicaid

Across child- and adult-serving systems, there is interest among communities and organizations to
provide transitional support to young adults with a strong focus on youth peer support (YPS). Often
organizations that provide parent/caregiver and adult peer services are interested in adding YPS to
their array of services. Many of the considerations and lessons learned in the implementation of parent
peer supports can be useful to organizations in communities and states building YPS.1 However, it
is important to note that these two supports are distinct in their approaches to training, hiring, and
supervision practices because youth peer providers are individuals who are working to maintain
personal wellness while also providing supports. In addition, as recipients of services they often
experience systems and cultures differently.

To access the document, click here.

Rocking Your Youth Movement: A Guide to Rockstar Sustainability

You have just taken the first step towards taking your Youth M.O.V.E. Chapter to the next level! This toolkit is designed to help develop a Chapter that is sustainable, builds organizational and local capacity, and has the full involvement of the community. This information was developed to help lead Chapters through the process of understanding what sustainability means and how it affects activities. Plus it provides practical applications to help youth advocates, advocates for youth and supportive adults carry out strategies to sustain youth voice in each community. Generation Next™ is a concept developed by Youth M.O.V.E. National, which recognizes that in order to sustain any youth movement, it is essential that there is continuous engagement and creation of the next generation of members as Youth Advocates transition to Advocates for Youth. Key concepts in Generation Next ™ are shared events and experiences, mentorship, leadership development and modeling authentic youth-adult partnerships1.

To access the booklet, click here.

SAMHSA’s Youth Engagement Guidance: Strategies, Tools and Tips for Supportive and Meaningful Youth Engagement in Federal Government-Sponsored Meetings and Events

To access, click here.

Mental Health of Transgender Children Who Are Supported in Their Identities
Transgender children who have socially transitioned, that is, who identify as the gender “opposite” their natal sex and are supported to live openly as that gender, are increasingly visible in society, yet we know nothing about their mental health. Previous work with children with gender identity disorder (GID; now termed gender dysphoria) has found remarkably high rates of anxiety and depression in these children. Here we examine, for the first time, mental health in a sample of socially transitioned transgender children.

To access this report, click here.

Starting the Conversation: College and Your Mental Health
Attending college is an important achievement and exciting time in life. You will gain greater independence, meet new people and have new and memorable experiences. It is a time of significant transition, which can be both positive and challenging. For some, the stress of college may impact mental health, making it difficult to manage the daily demands of school. In fact, did you know as many as one in five students experiences a mental health condition while in college?

To access the full guide, click here.

A Strategic Primer of College Student Mental Health

We want students to learn and grow during college. Parents, employers, and the public expect that college graduates will have acquired knowledge and certain qualities, skills, and abilities, including cognitive, career, and practical compe­tencies. They will demonstrate competency in critical thinking, communication, teamwork, resiliency, and problem solving. They will be committed to personal and social responsibility, intercultural competency, and civic engagement, and possess the ability to apply learning across multiple fields and in many dimensions (Association of American Colleges and Uni­versities 2007). A graduate who has developed those qualities is ready for success in life and work.

To read the full report, click here.

Youth Engagement in Wraparound
Wraparound is intended to be a process that is driven by the ideas and perspectives of family members — including not only parents or other caregivers, but also the youth or child whose needs have brought the family to services. Practice can fall short of this ideal, however, and research has documented that young people are often not meaningfully included as full partners in the Wraparound process.
Click herepdf

Youth Engagement/Involvement Resources:
-ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST – Based on Youth on Board’s publication 14 Points: Successfully Involving Youth in Decision Making
Click herepdf

This checklist is to be used as a guide to help give direction, uncover hidden issues,help understand tasks, and guide commitment to this initiative. Use this checklist as a tool with your board, your staff, young people, or other concerned parties.
-Youth Involvement Questionnaire Click herepdf
-Supporting the Development of Youth Run Organizations Click herepdf

This resource was developed to cover some of the key issues that Statewide Family Network Grantees face as they work to support the development of youth-run organizations. The information contained in this document comes from Youth MOVE National and from direct feedback from focus groups conducted to gather this information. While the guide provides suggestions, youth groups differ from community to community, and this guide may not contain all of the support your community needs. This document encourages creativity, innovation, and staying true to being youth driven.

Student Guide to Surviving Stress and Anxiety in College & Beyond

Click here

Mental Health and Wellbeing for College Students

Click here

Youth Peer to Peer Literature Review
Reason for the Review:
Peer-to-peer support has been an essential component for successful recovery in the adult mental health and substance abuse systems. The same support is urgently needed for youth in transition. However, peer-to-peer support for youth must be developmentally appropriate and specific to the unique needs of youth in transition. This literature review will look at peer support history, programs, outcome studies, and resources with an emphasis on youth.
Click herepdf

Youth & Young Adult Peer Support: What research tells us about its effectiveness in mental health services

Increasing the availability of peer support for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions has been advocated by service users, researchers, and government commissions. Efforts to provide peer support for young people are becoming more and more common. This FAQ describes the research evidence for peer support, as well as some of the challenges that can be expected when peer support is implemented.

Youth & Young Adult Peer Support

Language in the Youth MOVEment: A Compilation of Terms
Youth M.O.V.E. National uses a specific set of terms that are vital to Youth M.O.V.E.ment work. In an effort to ensure that usage of these terms is relevant to young adults across the country we created a compilation of terms and their general understandings, from the perspective of young people. This compilation was created, with the help of young adults who are members of Youth M.O.V.E. chapters across the country, in a series of discussions held June through September 2013.
Click herepdf

Youth Involvement in Systems of Care: A Guide to Empowerment
Youth Involvement in Systems of Care: A Guide to Empowerment has been developed in partnership with two young people who are currently involved in local systems of care1 as well as a team of youth and youth coordinator reviewers from across the country. The guide was also vetted to multiple reviewers including internal staff from the American Institutes for Research as well as Gary Blau, Ph.D. from the Center for Mental Health Services, Child, Adolescent, and Family Branch.
Click herepdf

Youth Engagement
Can You Hear Me Now? Historical References to Youth Involvement and Strategies for Successful Youth Engagement
Click herepdf

A Youth Guide to Treatment and Treatment Planning: A Better Life
This guide is about the kind of treatment youth get when people are worried about their safety, behavior, ability to be happy, mental health, or relationships.
Click herepdf

Youth-Adult Partnerships in Systems of Care
The “youth guided” value built into systems of care has paved the way for youth and adults to work together to transform systems and improve outcomes for children, youth, and families. To this end, the TA Partnership has supported systems of care in developing youth-adult partnerships. This document provides an overview of youth-adult partnerships in systems of care and offers suggestions that address challenges that are common in these partnerships. This document is intended to serve as a “living document”—future updates will include resources and examples provided by system of care communities.
Click herepdf

Integrating “Youth Guided” and “Cultural and Linguistic Competence” Values into Systems of Care
The Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health (TA Partnership) has developed this module to support you in bringing a cultural and linguistic competence lens to your youth-guided work. This module contains some de­finitions of common terminology, recommended actions, and questions to ask yourself and your community about the youth-guided and cultural and linguistic competence values.
Click herepdf

Promoting Youth Engagement in Residential Settings: Suggestions from Youth with Lived Experience
The strategies and ideas presented in this document were elicited from youth through focus group discussions. Focus groups were held with more than 50 youth between the ages of 15-22, all of whom are currently in residential settings. By drawing on their personal experiences, the focus group participants were asked to offer ideas regarding how residential providers can better engage youth. Additionally, the youth were asked to think about and react to scenarios and struggles that youth might face in residential settings. At the final stages of the development of this guide, a large focus group of youth currently in residential settings met to validate the themes developed from the previous discussions, and to provide specific suggestions and feedback for residential providers. The Building Bridges Initiative’s Youth Advisory Group, which consists of youth members, youth leaders, and youth advocates from across the country, provided feedback on the content of this paper at various stages of the writing process.
Click herepdf

Promoting Youth Engagement: What Providers Should Know About Best Practices and Promising Strategies
Youth with lived experience1, providers2, and policy makers3 have articulated the crucial need for residential services to embrace youth-guided principles and practices.This paper provides a summary of best and promising practices for promoting youth engagement in residential settings. The document was developed as a companion piece to the Building Bridges Initiative paper, Promoting Youth Engagement in Residential Settings: Suggestions from Youth with Lived Experience, which describes insights and suggestions from youth currently in residential settings about ways providers can engage them. Below is a synopsis of key research findings, articles, and documents regarding youth engagement in residential. These best and promising practices complement and contextualize the perspectives offered by the youth in the previous paper.
Click herepdf

Making Healthy Choices: A Guide on Psychotropic Medications for Youth in Foster Care
WHY READ THIS GUIDE?
This guide can help you figure out if certain medications are right for you. It was created by a group of youth who have experienced foster care, doctors, social workers, and others who care about young people. Sometimes your thoughts, emotions, or behaviors get in the way of doing things you want to do. Maybe you’re not able to sleep at night or do your homework or have fun with friends. This guide talks about psychotropic medications—one option that may help you feel better. These medications can have many benefits. They also can cause negative side effects and can be harmful if not used correctly. Once you know more, you can decide whether these medications are a good option for you.
Click herepdf

Supporting the Development of Youth Run Organizations
This resource was developed to cover some of the key issues that Statewide Family Network Grantees face as they work to support the development of youth-run organizations. The information contained in this document comes from Youth MOVE National and from direct feedback from focus groups conducted to gather this information. While the guide provides suggestions, youth groups differ from community to community, and this guide may not contain all of the support your community needs. This document encourages creativity, innovation, and staying true to being youth driven.
Click herepdf

Transition Aged Youth Program Fact Sheets
This compendium of fact sheets describes 34 programs administered by the federal government that could help young people (14-30 year-olds) gain a firm footing on the path to a career and independent living. While some programs may target a broad population, others only serve a subset of youth and young adults, such as individuals age 18 to 25.  It should be noted that only programs authorized and funded in Fiscal Year 2012 are included; the compendium does not include proposals or programs that do not have funding.
Click herepdf