NEW Resources

Access to Mental Health Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs
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Successfully Engaging Families Formed by Adoption: Strategies for Residential Leaders - A Building Bridges Initiative Informational Document
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Suicide Warning Signs & Prevention – Rutgers Online

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Telling Your Personal Story

Most of us think of story telling as a casual act. Because this is the case, we often tell stories in a spontaneous way that may not be organized. This works well in many instances, but not for the purpose of advocacy. To encourage systems change, personal stories need to be told in a much more structured way. The story we tell key decision makers must clearly communicate a purpose, and at the same time, include memorable details that keep the listener’s interest long after the story is told.

Legislators and other public officials often hear thousands of stories every day. That’s why it’s important to move your personal story.

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Facts for Families
Over 200 pages of fact sheets for families about Child Psychiatrists, Individualized Education Plans, Childhood Depression, and so much more.
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Individualized Education Plan Tips
This manual was written by two very distinguished professionals, Attorney Anne Eason and Professor Kathleen Whitbread. Both Anne and Kathleen are also Moms who have made inclusion work for their children with disabilities and numerous other children with disabilities throughout their community. What makes this manual on inclusive education so effective, are the practical tips based upon the authors own experiences as well as upon best practices delineated in the professional literature. As a parent myself, I found this manual so useful and parent friendly, I feel deeply it should be made available to all parents of school aged children with disabilities
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Student Guide to Surviving Stress and Anxiety in College & Beyond

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Mental Health and Wellbeing for College Students

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Preventing Substance Abuse Among LGBTQ Teens
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) teens may be two times as likely to be bullied, excluded or assaulted at school. And they’re nearly 40 percent less likely to have an adult in their family to whom they can turn. So it’s no surprise that they may be twice as likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol.1 Families, professionals and policymakers can help prevent substance abuse by supporting all young people — and ensuring that LGBTQ teens have equal access to that support.
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Recommendations for Educators on Talking with Families
Schools are a critically important source of information for families about their children, including information about their emotional and mental well being. With children in the classroom for the majority of their day, teachers and school professionals are in a key position to notice learning, functioning and behavioral problems that should be communicated to parents.
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Be Vocal: Speak up for Mental Health
Be Vocal is a partnership between singer, songwriter and mental health advocate Demi Lovato, who is living with bipolar disorder; leading mental health advocacy organizations, including Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, The JED Foundation, Mental Health America, the National Alliance on Mental Illness and the National Council for Behavioral Health; and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. This is the first time these organizations have come together to support an initiative focused on helping individuals and communities advocate for themselves and others.
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National Center of Excellence for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
When young children go to child care or preschool they should be in a nurturing and stimulating environment where they can play, learn and have fun. That’s why SAMHSA, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) have partnered to establish a National Center of Excellence for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC). The National Center of Excellence will provide state-of-the-art tools, training and technical assistance to build strong, sustainable IECMHC systems in states and tribes. Home visiting professionals will have greater knowledge and skills for helping families who are dealing with health and mental health issues such as attachment disorders, trauma and maternal depression.
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Fact Sheet #28B: FMLA leave for birth, placement, bonding, or to care for a child with a serious health condition on the basis of an “in loco parentis” relationship
The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles an eligible employee to take up to 12 workweeks of job-protected unpaid leave for the birth or placement of a son or daughter, to bond with a newborn or newly placed son or daughter, or to care for a son or daughter with a serious health condition. See 29 USC 2612(a)(1). This Fact Sheet provides guidance on an employee’s entitlement to FMLA leave to bond with or care for a child to whom the employee stands “in loco parentis.” You may also wish to review Fact Sheet #28C on FMLA leave to care for a parent on the basis of an in loco parentis relationship.
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